Welcome to Seenu Atoll School

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SAM SPORTS

Makita Inter School Athletics Meet 2013 , Seenu Atoll School had participated in makita Junior Championship 2013 which was orginzed by Athletics Association of Maldives. School is Also performed well in this Championship . .

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Childrens Day 2013

Students Of SAM " Seen Atoll School Athletics team going to their respective tant .

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PRIZE DAY 2012

the Chief guest of the Ceremony Principal GNAEC Education Center Mr Abdullah Rasheedh and the Principal of Seenu Atoll School Mis Aminath Zeeniya .

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SAM CADETS

SAM CADETS LCPL Aishath Faruha and PVT Makthoom Rasheedh Going Behind Best All Around Student Mohamed Saaif with National Flag and School Flag .

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Tab number #5

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SAM SPORTS

Seenu Atoll School Has Got 37 medals and School is in third place in the Tournament .

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Agri Club

Agri Teacher Mr Santhosh is handing over the lettuce to the principal of Seenu Atoll school miss Aminath Zeeniya.

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Inauguration #8

Inauguration a.

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Discipline

  • Tuesday, July 10, 2012
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  • You would never think of setting up a math or reading program in your building that treated every student exactly the same. You would not expect all students to use the same reader. You would not place an entire school in the same math book. If you did any of these things, your school board and your community would demand an immediate explanation. Yet, we set up discipline systems in our schools that treat all students exactly the same. In fact, everyone expects us to do just that!

    Just as students function at different levels in reading and math, they also function at different levels, or stages, of discipline. It is possible to set up a consistent system for classroom discipline that will be appropriate for students functioning a t all stages and at the same time encourage them to work their way up to higher stages.

    There are many experts telling us how to handle discipline problems in our classrooms. Yet these experts do not always agree. Thomas Gordon, creator of Teacher Effectiveness Training staunchly opposes Lee Canter’s Assertive Discipline concept. Yet, both have enjoyed a great deal of success all across America. Trying to decide who is right and who is wrong seems quite difficult. Instead, let us assume that both of them are right, that they just are not talking about the same students!

    If we look at the work of Lawrence Kohlberg, we find the piece that will put this puzzle together. For many years Kohlberg studied stages of moral and ethical reasoning in youngsters from the United States, Taiwan, Mexico, Turkey, and Yucatan. One important fact that surfaced in his research is that everyone, regardless of culture, race, or sex, goes through these stages. Although the progression from stage to stage is the same, the rate varies from person to person. It is for this reason that we need to be prepared to address discipline in our classrooms at different levels. Our students are functioning at different stages on the road to self-discipline.

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    Seenu Atoll School sports club - Announcement

  • Saturday, March 10, 2012
  • by

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    Today there is special Football match between Former students and presents students of Seenu Atoll School at 16:15. So sports club invites all the students as well as former students come to school for taking part in the event

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    Tips for Effective Study

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  • The most common barrier to success encountered by college students is a lack of effective techniques for study and exam preparation. If you are one of the vast majority of students whose answer to the question, "How do you study for your tests?" is, "I go over my notes," then you need to take a serious look at your study skills. Here are some suggestions to increase your effectiveness as a student.

    I.

    Day to Day

    A.

    Take good notes. Very few students leave high school with this skill. College of DuPage's Learning Lab can help you here. Some suggestions and observations.

    1.

    Always take the notes for a particular class in the same notebook. Spiral bound notebooks were invented because they solved the problem of keeping related information consolidated in one place. Take advantage of this.

    2.

    Date each entry into your notebook.

    3.

    It is usually best to keep the notes for different classes separate from each other. Spiral notebooks with built in dividers are excellent for this purpose.

    4.

    Your notes should contain as complete a record of what the instructor said as possible. Of course, you should not try to write every word spoken, but don't leave out ideas. When you study, your notes should call back to your mind the entire sequence of ideas presented. Take care to spell all new words carefully. It you don't know how to spell a word, ask your instructor to write it on the board. Most will automatically do so for new or difficult terms.

    5.

    Anything the instructor writes on the board should appear in your notes. If the instructor took the time to write it out, he or she considers it important. You should do the same.

    6.

    If possible, try to take your notes in some kind of outline form. The organization of ideas is as important as the content of those ideas, especially when it comes to learning the material for an exam.

    7.

    You might find it useful to have a second color of pen or pencil available for highlighting important ideas or indicating vocabulary.

    B.

    Be involved in your classes. Don't simply pretend you are a sponge, ready to soak up whatever the instructor says. You are there to learn, not to be taught.

    1.

    If the instructor is moving too rapidly for you, or if you don't understand what is being said, say something!

    2.

    Ask questions if you are confused. Confusion is definitely your worst enemy.

    3.

    If your class includes group activities, participate as fully as you can. Such exercises are done for your benefit, not to provide a break for the instructor.

    C.

    Review your notes every day. This suggestion is one which we have all heard a thousand times. Unfortunately, most of us never really believe it until we actually try it. Spend 30 minutes or so each evening going over the notes from each class. There are at least two tremendous benefits to be gained from this discipline.

    1.

    Research has shown that reviewing new material within 24 hours of hearing it increases your retention of that material by about 60%. This means that you will be 60% ahead of the game the next time you walk into class. If you want to significantly reduce the time necessary to prepare for exams, this is the way to do it.

    2.

    Reviewing material before the next class period enables you to identify points of confusion or omission in your notes, which prepares you to ask the questions you need to ask before the next lecture. Again, confusion is your worst enemy.

    D.

    It is excellent policy to give high priority to new vocabulary. Language is the most fundamental tool of any subject, and it can seriously handicap you to fall behind in this.

    E.

    Keep up on your reading. Unlike most high school teachers, many college instructors don't give specific reading assignments. You are expected to go to your text for the reading related to the materials covered in class. Be independent enough to do this without being told.

     

    II.

    Using Your Textbook

    A.

    Don't expect your instructor to give you detailed, page by page textbook assignments. While some may do so, many do not. College teachers are much more likely to expect you to use your own initiative in making use of the text.

    B.

    In most cases, it will be most useful for you to at least skim the relevant chapters before each lecture. You should receive a course outline/syllabus at the beginning of the quarter, which will tell you the subject for each day. You may receive chapter references (or even page references), or you instructor may expect you to be perceptive enough to refer to the Table of Contents.

    1.

    When you first approach a chapter, page through it fairly quickly, noting boldface headings and subheadings, examining figures, illustrations, charts, etc., and thinking about any highlighted vocabulary terms and concepts. Also take note of the pedagogical aids at the end of the chapter--study questions, summary, etc.

    2.

    When you have finished surveying the chapter, return to the beginning and read in more detail. Remember to concentrate upon understanding. Don't simply read through the words. Any words which you don't understand you should look up. If you own the book and intend to keep it, you may want to write definitions of such words in the margins. You may also find it helpful to make observations and other useful notes in the margins. If you don't intend to keep the book yourself, you should carry out similar activities on a page in your class notebook.

    3.

    On this first trip through the chapter, you should concentrate upon catching the major subjects and points of the material. Also take note of those things which you don't understand. If the lecture on the material doesn't clarify those points, you should ask your instructor to explain.

    C.

    Following coverage of the chapter's material in class, you should go back to the book and read it again. It will probably be helpful to skim through it first, as you did when you first looked at it. The tables and figures should be more readily read in detail. If you are a truly conscientious student, you will outline the chapter and prepare a vocabulary list of the terms which are pertinent.

    D.

    At this time you should think seriously about the review and study questions at the end of the chapter. Do your best to answer all fo them as if they were a take-home exam.

    E.

    You may also want to develop a system of cross referencing symbols to use when comparing your class notes to your notes from the text.

    F.

    Remember that your instructor will probably not use the same words which you find in the text book. nothing is more frustrating than to discover that what you hear in class is no more than a rehash of what you read in the book. However, if your instructor knows his/her subject, and the author of your text knows his/her subject, the meat of what they say should be the same. NOTE: Nobody is infallible. Your instructor may make mistakes. Don't expect him or her to be more than human.

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    Exam Techniques, Tips and Tricks

  • Tuesday, September 20, 2011
  • by
  • 1) Revise actively.

    Just reading through your notes is the worst possible way to revise. Well, OK, perhaps not the worst possible, but it’s really not very good. The more of your brain you can engage in the revision, the more you will remember. Memory is not a box in one part of your brain that things are either in or out. Memory is spread out everywhere: there’s verbal memory, visual memory, audio memory, muscle memory, all sorts. The more your brain does with the information, the more you will remember.

    So don’t just read. Make up poems and mnemonics. Summarise the notes. Set them to music. Extract key points and write them down yourself somewhere – even if you’re just copying them out, this is better than just reading, since more of your brain is involved. Make up quizzes and do them. Write limericks. Above all – do problems. Make up your own if you run out. Get active!

    2) Plan revision.

    Write a good revision plan, and stick to it. Don’t do just one subject a day, you’ll get tired of it; then again swopping too often means you don’t get the chance to get deep into anything. I used to do mornings on one subject, afternoons on another and evenings on a third.

    3) Do past papers – as many as you can lay your hands on.

    The internal web has (at least) the last three year's papers on it. Papers from previous years are stored in the library (at least that used to be true - it's worth checking if they still have them). Work through them. If you can't do a question, check that it is still in the syllabus (the modules change every year, and it's always worth checking what is new). With a good revision plan you should be doing nothing in the last week before the exams except working through exam papers and examples sheets making sure you can do them.

    I can’t emphasise the importance of this enough. Anyone who doesn’t work through past papers has very little chance of doing well in an exam.

    Oh - and do the past papers, and the examples sheets, against the clock. Time is short in an exam, you need to get used to thinking, and writing quickly. Get your hand trained up so it can write fast (but legibly, please).

    4) Question-spotting.

    This can be risky, but if you're playing the percentages it's worth a try. Look for any topic that was in the exam two and three years ago, but not last year. If you can get hold of papers from further back, try and spot patterns: does any topic come up every other year, for example?

    Another good tip is to make a very careful note if the lecturer says at any point "this is new in the course this year". If he does, there's an above average chance that this will be in the exam - it gets harder every year to come up with new questions about the same old subjects, and putting a new topic in the course is an easy "new question" for the examiner.
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    How to choose a career

  • Tuesday, July 5, 2011
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  • How to choose a career is an extended free article that will provide you with lots of great tips on how you can choose your ideal career. If you are having trouble choosing a career, then please read this article that will give you our top 3 tips when it comes to how to choose a career. Please also take the time to come back as we will be adding new valuable resources and articles on how to choose a career. For many of us, finding a career that we deem fun and long-term is in itself a long journey. But having a successful career in life is not just for the rich and famous, it's also for the average person, like you!

    We as humans are prone to look at successful individuals like Oprah or Bill Gates and assume that somehow they became wealthy and innovative overnight, but it truly took many years, time, effort, and perseverance. There are three important points to address when asking the question, what career is right for me?

    Firstly, you must discover what are those standing and lasting values that make you who you are. What things interest you or what things make you want to stop as soon as you begin. Choosing a career is all about you, because if you don't know who you are as an individual, it's going to be extremely hard to convince your potential employer to entrust you with a job.
    For some of us, we value our families and the ability to schedule work around life or for some it may be the need to work around certain types of people, rather than others. Whatever those values and ideals fit you, you must be comfortable with yourself and willing to try new things!

    Secondly, you must figure out what you are good at and what brings out the best of your abilities. Obviously, if you are great at painting artwork, but really can't stand working outside in the scorching heat, then you probably don't want to apply for a job as a car mechanic. There are many ways to figure out what you are good at, simply just by asking yourself what are your likes and dislikes, your expectations for your dream career, and what steps you would have to take to get there. Whenever someone comes up to me and complains about their job and how they dislike it so much, I always ask why you are still doing it. Work in a field that fits your mold and who you are, not based on pay or some other factor.

    Thirdly and most importantly, do something you love! Never get lured into doing a job that makes you grumpy and angry at the world. There are too many career positions out there waiting for someone with your talents to come aboard. Happiness in career and life to me is one of the most vital issues we should all cherish as human beings. Being happy is not only good for those who spend the most time with you, such as your spouse, kids, or friends, it's also good for your health, happiness, and well-being. Like I said before, a great career is not just for the rich and famous, it's for all of us. Some of us have wealthy parents and can just inherit money or work for them, while others have to work their hardest to earn a decent living. But whatever the case may be, your dreams and goals can come true in life, no matter your age, race, or any other factor. Just remember to set goals, aim high, and never give up! You have to be willing to be an innovator and a visionist in your quest to find that dream career. In the words of Robert Byrne, “The purpose of life is a life of purpose.”
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    Notice for Students

    Up comming Events

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    Report giving 2011

    Prize Day 2011

    Past papers